Category Archives: Desertification and Soil Loss

My New Book

By David L. Brown I am pleased to announce the publication of my new book DEAD END PATH: How Industrial Agriculture Has Stolen Our Future. This work, in the form of an extended essay, is the result of a lifetime … Continue reading

Posted in Agriculture Issues, Book Reviews, Desertification and Soil Loss, Economics, Essays and Opinion, Famine, Fossil Fuels, Politics, Resource Depletion, Technology | Comments Off on My New Book

Australian Dust Warns of Declining Water

By David L. Brown According to Wired magazine’s web site, the dust storm that engulfed Sydney, Australia three days ago was “apocalyptic.” In this image taken from space, that description doesn’t  seem over-the-top. You can see this and another NASA … Continue reading

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California Vulnerable to Water Disaster

By David L. Brown As our readers know we have pointed out many problems facing the Earth and human civilization. There is always a common denominator, it seems, a thread that winds its way through all the dangers facing our … Continue reading

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The World in 2100: A Choice of Futures

By David L. Brown Despite all the hullabaloo about global warming, the resulting climate change, and the impact on humanity, I continue to be amazed at the reluctance of those who discuss the subject to face up to the fact … Continue reading

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Food Supplies Losing Race to Famine

By David L. Brown How thin is the line that divides world food supplies from famine? This thin: If China were to import another five percent of its total grain needs, it would completely eliminate all grain available in the … Continue reading

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Australian Climate Disaster Looms Closer

by Val Germann It wasn’t big news here in the U.S., the reports late last week that Australia’s Prime Minister had broached the possibility of cutting off the water allotments for nearly half of Australia’s farmers. No, that story was … Continue reading

Posted in Agriculture Issues, Climate Change, Desertification and Soil Loss | 12 Comments

Trees … To Be or Not to Be

By David L. Brown The growing concern about “global warming,” that misleading terminology used to define the climate change that is taking place on the Earth, has yielded a number of proposals to help mitigate the rise of greenhouse gases … Continue reading

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Biofuel Craze May Ruin World’s Forests

by Val Germann Yes, it is now a “craze,” this rush toward “biofuels.”  It all sounds so good, at first glance, and terms like “clean diesel” seem like harbingers of a hydrocarbon promised land.  But as we have been writing … Continue reading

Posted in Age of Oil, Agriculture Issues, Desertification and Soil Loss | Comments Off on Biofuel Craze May Ruin World’s Forests

Africa’s “Great Lakes” All Facing Destruction

by Val Germann There can be little doubt that a world wide drought is well under way.  The American west has been suffering severe water shortages for years, as has most of Australia.  Brazil is in dought, too, and the Amazon under … Continue reading

Posted in Climate Change, Desertification and Soil Loss | 7 Comments

Water Shortages Threaten World with Famine

By David L. Brown Who will feed the growing populations of the world’s third world countries in the coming years? Yes, the threat of famine has been dismissed repeatedly ever since Paul Ehrlich and others raised a warning in the … Continue reading

Posted in Agriculture Issues, Desertification and Soil Loss, Population Issues, Resource Depletion | 6 Comments